The KING is dead – Long Live his Funky People

ripBesides touring the earth and performing magically good shows and also record albums, singles, soundtracks, going to jail and what not, Mr. James Brown (God rest his Soul) also owned one, two or three record companies. (Funky) People was one of them and daaaaamn, did some hot shit occur from there. All in all, 3 compilation disks were issued during the nineties; here they are.

#1
The first in the wildly popular three-disc series, James Brown’s Funky People is an outstandingly chunky collection that spotlights some of the many talented musicians associated with James Brown and his early- to mid-’70s People Records imprint. The material comprising this disc is split primarily between the J.B.’s, Fred Wesley both with and without the J.B.’s, and one of funk’s original divas, Lyn Collins. “Gimme Some More,” “Pass the Peas,” “Givin’ up Food for Funk (Part 1),” and “Hot Pants Road” are the J.B.’s’ offerings, spectacular studio recordings that highlight some of the band’s best material for the label — material which at the time was often passed over in favor of their “proper” James Brown recordings. Fred Wesley, meanwhile, weighs in with the CD-only long version of “Damn Right, I Am Somebody (Parts 1 & 2),” before joining the J.B.’s on three more tracks, including the epic “(It’s Not the Express) It’s the J.B.’s Monaurail (Part 1).” This particular song, credited to Fred and the New J.B.’s, was recorded during one of the more traumatic times in the James Brown camp and, when compared to the other classics on this CD, doesn’t have the same spark or fire. And if anyone questioned the odd spelling in the title, the band’s request that if you don’t know what a monorail is “check out Seattle” clears up any doubt. The Lyn Collins tracks feature a mono version of “Mama Feelgood” and the outstanding “Think (About It),” a song that would become an iconoclastic symbol of the funk era, heavily sampled by over 40 artists during the 1980s and 1990s. Included, too, is the bonus “Same Beat (Part 1),” recorded by Wesley and the J.B.’s on September 7, 1973, in New York.

#2
The second volume of material compiled from Brown’s People Records label isn’t quite as strong as the first, as it reaches for more obscurities — but those obscurities can be interesting, especially Brown’s collaboration with Hank Ballard on “From the Love Side.” Again, Brown wrote (or co-wrote), arranged, and produced much of the material, appearing on vocals several times, and the J.B.’s are featured heavily, whether as a unit or with individual members stepping out as solo acts. The highlights are Bobby Byrd’s two 1971 R&B hits, “I Know You Got Soul” and “Hot Pants — I’m Coming, Coming, I’m Coming”; also featured are Marva Whitney, Lyn Collins, and Fred Wesley, among others.

#3
James Brown’s Funky People, Pt. 3 collects more funky tracks from Brown’s early ’70s People label, which included Vicki Anderson, Hank Ballard and the Dapps, Lyn Collins, and the Dee Felice Trio. The album opens with the hard-to-find “rock” version of Brown’s “Talkin’ Loud and Sayin’ Nothin’,” which was withdrawn within days of its release, and also includes a previously unreleased, undubbed version of Fred Wesley & the J.B.s’ “Blow Your Head.” Rare singles such as Sweet Charles’ “Hang out & Hustle” and Beau Dollar’s “Who Knows” complete this collection, which consists entirely of songs that have never appeared on CD before.

(reviews nicked from answers.com) They’re all here. Enjoy, the True KING has passed.

Demonoid | Torrentspy

    6 thoughts on “The KING is dead – Long Live his Funky People

    1. Ik laat ze meestal in de schappen liggen (meeste al her en der verzameld), maar hier kan ik geen neen tegen zeggen. Dank gast!

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